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2 weeks ago

Sautéed Queen Scallop - Black Olive Salad (M)

Serves 4

1 lbs. Queen Scallops (bay scallops)
30 Quail Eggs (sub 8 small eggs or 6 large)
½ cup + 3 Tbs Olive Oil (extra virgin)
5 oz. Spring Leaf Mix Lettuce
4 Red Potatoes
3 oz. Kalamata Olives, pitted
3 Roma Tomatoes
2 oz. Blue Cheese Crumbles
1 oz. Walnuts chopped
2 tsp Celtic Caterer All Gaelic Seasoning
1 tsp Celtic Caterer Celtic Grilling seasoning
1 tsp Parsley
1 tsp Garlic Salt
1 tsp Salt
¼ tsp Basil, dry
¼ tsp Oregano
Red Wine Vinegar (few drops)

To be an island country like the Isle of Man, your diet will, of course be shaped by the sea around you. Though these people have a fixation with kippers, they are not the only fish in the sea. Queenies, as the locals call them, are the smaller size scallops; (also called Bay Scallops)are a wee bit more expensive, but OH SO worth it.

In fact, every year on the Island of Mann there is a WHOLE festival dedicated to these little delicacies. It’s a Queenie Festival, in honor of the queenie scallop. But this event, it is FAR more than just a food festival. In honor of combining both its Celtic and its Nordic Heritage. The festival merges some of its attractions with heroic deeds of the story of Beowulf. There are an epic ocean swimming races, amazing Sheep dog herding competitions, shows of athletic prowess, and even a competition in cheese making.

The dish here evolved out of this event. Its a great combination of different ingredients using Queenie (Bay Scallops), potatoes, Kalamata olives, hard boiled eggs, and still making a salad out of it with mix leaf lettuce, Blue cheese crumbles, walnuts, and that ever rare fruit, tomatoes.

This dish also shows the maritime economy of the island. Whatever they did not manufacture or farm, they acquired through its vast seafaring trade. Though the original recipe calls for quail eggs, they are exceedingly difficult to find in North America. However, I have found regular hard-boiled eggs are suitable substitutes, though not totally equal in flavor.

Step 1. Dice the tomatoes. Place them in frying pan with 3 Tbs of olive oil. Sprinkle them with the basil and oregano and some of the garlic salt. Sauté for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool.

Step 2. Cut potatoes into wedges and boil with salt until barely soft.

Step 3. In a separate saucepan boil the eggs for exactly 8 minutes (9 minutes for high altitude). This will give you that professional look of orange yolk instead of dull yellow. Place instantly into an ice bath to cool. Peel and quarter the eggs lengthwise.

Step 4. Sautee the scallops in ¼ cup olive oil with the parsley, and only ½ of both the All Gaelic and Grilling Seasoning.

Step 5. When scallops are nearly done, add in potatoes and pitted olives and continue to toss and sauté for 3 to 4 more minutes.

Step 6. Add in blue cheese crumbles, remaining Seasoning, walnuts and toss with remaining olive oil. Portion the spring lettuce mix into equal servings. Portion out each dish with scallop/ potato mix.

Step 7. Top each dish with eggs and dried tomato. Finally garnish each plate with a few drops of red wine vinegar and serve.

Chef Eric W. McBride is an Award-Winning Chef and Author of 6 Celtic Cookbooks, 10 Celtic Seasonings, and 5 Celtic Tea blends.
He currently travels to nearly 40 festivals across the country teaching and demonstrating about Celtic Cuisine. You can get a copy of one of his cookbooks, and all your Essential Celtic Spices at:
www.celticcaterer.com
ALLWAYS FREE SHIPPING

Chef McBride also performs a live Facebook Celtic Cooking Demonstration every Sunday evening at 6pm PST. You can go to:
“The Celtic Caterer & Chef Eric W. McBride”
www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=190584704313436&ref=br_rs
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Time to gather your friends - virtually, of course - to celebrate something so many of us love: Whiskey!!! Jameson has a bunch of fun things to share for World Whiskey Day on their YouTube channel. Tune in for tours, new recipes, and more. Whether you love your Jameson and ginger, or sipping a Jameson WITH a ginger, you're sure to enjoy. Sláinte! ... See MoreSee Less

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4 weeks ago

Irish Stuffed Mushrooms
www.celticcaterer.com

MUSHROOMS, Mushrooms, mushrooms: In all 8 Celtic Nations there is a massive love affair with mushrooms. References of the Celts love affair with mushrooms can be found from stories of fairies living in toad stools to the author J.R.R. Tolkien, talking about the Shire (a similarity to his childhood home on the borders of Wales). In fact, many authors describe mushrooms in their stories as they all look lie a piece of fiction.

Celtic Mushrooms are highly prized on the Island of Mann, for their highly Prized Mt. Greeba Mushrooms, which are found in nearly every major Fine dinning kitchen in Europe. As well as in both Galicia and Asturia, where there are over 2,000 different types of wild mushrooms, that transcends the Bretons love affair for truffles.

This love affair with mushrooms in all 8 Celtic Nations, exists since so many of the 8 Celtic Nations are very close to a coastline, or with areas with wet bogs or marshlands, it is only natural that mushrooms have been an intricate part of Celtic Cuisine.

According to the Oxford press, mushrooms have been consumed by the Celts since their earliest origins near Hallstatt, Austria in the 8th Century BCE. There is even a theory that the people who first built the ancient Dolmans on the west coast of Ireland ate mushrooms along with oysters. The real science behind growing mushrooms commercially started in the 1600s when French agriculturist Olivier de Serres described a method of how “mushrooms could be grown in a controlled way by transplanting their mycelia.” This was demonstrated in 1678 to the French Academie des Sciences.

On a nutritional aspect, mushrooms are “low in calories, cholesterol, fat and sodium yet packed with essential vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. They're also a good source of easily absorbed, high quality vegetable protein with the added bonus of amino acids,”

This recipe of the Irish, infuses the love affairs of Mushrooms with the crunchy flavors of Walnuts and breadcrumbs and minced with sautéed shallots in Butter or Olive Oil.

Serves 4-6

1 lb of Mushrooms whole
3/4 Cup of Butter
½ Cup of Finely chopped Walnuts
1/3 Cup of chopped Shallots
1/3 Cup of Breadcrumbs
1 tsp CC- All Gaelic seasoning (Mediterranean Thyme, white pepper)
½ tsp CC- Breton Wild Mushroom Seasoning (Truffle Salt, Porcini, Shiitake bolete
Parsley, chives, shallots, Tarragon)

Step 1. Place the chopped Shallots in a sauce pan with 1/2 a cup of butter.

Step 2. Break off the Stem from the Mushrooms and using only half of them, chop up finely

Step 3. Place the chopped stems in the saucepan along with the walnuts and all the seasoning. Mix and allow to simmer add in the breadcrumbs. Make sure the mixture is evenly moist with butter, add more butter if needed.

Step 4. In a fry pan melt the remaining butter and gently cook the mushroom caps. When they are evenly coated with butter remove and pinch the mixture into the Mushroom caps serve warm.

THIS RECIPE AND MANY OTHERS ARE AVAILABLE IN BOOK II: RECIPES OF IRELAND.

Chef Eric W. McBride is an Award-Winning Chef and Author of 6 Celtic Cookbooks, 10 Celtic Seasonings, and 5 Celtic Tea blends.
He currently travels to nearly 40 festivals across the country teaching and demonstrating about Celtic Cuisine. You can get a copy of one of his cookbooks, and all your Essential Celtic Spices at:
www.celticcaterer.com
ALLWAYS FREE SHIPPING

Chef McBride also performs a live Facebook Celtic Cooking Demonstration every Sunday evening at 6pm PST. You can go to:
“The Celtic Caterer & Chef Eric W. McBride”
www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=190584704313436&ref=br_rs
... See MoreSee Less

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Description
Location
Festival Stats
  • Where is it at?
    Kansas City, Missouri, USA
  • How many days?
    3 days
  • What is the setting?
    Outdoors, Indoors, City
  • What is the atmopshere?
    Family friendly, All ages, Culture (art, etc.)
  • How many people?
    90,000+
  • Where do I stay?
    Hotels, Airbnb
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